Once the storm passed, they decided to scout the area for sponges be… Antikythera clockwork computer may be even older than thought New detective work suggests that the ancient mechanism was built in the 2nd century BC Published: 29 Jul 2009 The Antikythera mechanism is an ancient mechanical analog computer (as opposed to digital computer) designed to calculate astronomical positions. The Antikythera Mechanism used triangular teeth. ", Dionysis Kriaris, in Greece, has built a model based on the new findings, which is now in display at the Children Museum of Manhattan, and forms part of the "Gods, Myths and Mortals" exhibition. B.C.) The Mechanism is the first analogue computer ever created and the oldest scientific instrument in the world - by a very long way. on a voyage from Asia Minor to Rome. Figure 2. In 1900, a group of Greek sponge divers were sailing back to Symi, an island in the Rhodes region of Southern Greece. The model uses no fasteners, and would need a few if printed. It’s a wonder the Antikythera mechanism was discovered at all. The first scholar, who studied the function of the Mechanism … The Antikythera Mechanism: dates from 200—100 BCE; discovered in 1900 by a team of sponge divers off the south coast of Greece (near the islet of Antikythera, midway between the Peloponnese and Crete) Speaking of its current location in Athens: “It looks like something from another world –nothing like the classical statues and vases A few years ago, engineer Theodor Sartoros had his model patented by the DPMA: "Antikythera mechanism with planetarium, calendar and clock (electric or hydraulic)"( DE 10 2010 015 501 B4 (1,64 MB)). The sponge divers salvaged from the ship three flat pieces of corroded bronze t… The Antikythera mechanism is an ancient Greek analogue computer used to predict astronomical positions and eclipses for calendar and astrological purposes decades in advance. At the top and bottom of the digital model is the Parapegma inscription (courtesy of Hublot, with data from the Antikythera Mechanism Research Project). In 1900, a boatload of sponge divers in the Mediterranean were forced off course by a storm and took shelter nearby the island of Antikythera. The next day, they went diving near the island and discovered a 2,000-year-old Greek shipwreck, according to NOVA. I had a friend in honours year computer science who did a project on tomography of the antikythera mechanism (working on image analysis software to remove ghost images of other layers), and helped discover why his advisor's previous model of the mechanism was mechanically immobile (when you turned it, it locked). Variations of this model, which is not functional, are on display at the Museum. It was discovered in the Antikythera … The first model of the Antikythera Mechanism was actually build in the 1930s by Ioannis Theofanides.A model based on Derek Price's work was built in the 1980s by Robert Deroski and donated by Price to the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. This model alludes to the fact that the Antikythera Mechanism was actually an orrery, a device mentioned in ancient literature that showed the positions of the heavenly bodies using a large clockwork mechanism. In tune with imperial propaganda. All the gears that need to have locked rotations are keyed and spaced out with spacers, but some of the keys are really small loose pieces and should be changed. I had a friend in honours year computer science who did a project on tomography of the antikythera mechanism (working on image analysis software to remove ghost images of other layers), and helped discover why his advisor's previous model of the mechanism was mechanically immobile (when you turned it, it locked). The Antikythera Mechanism was a marvelous ancient mechanism with more than 37 gears, 17 axis, and 8 pointers. The Antikythera mechanism was similar in size to a mantel clock, and bits of wood found on the fragments suggest it was housed in a wooden case. In 1929 Captain Ioannis Theopanidis attempted to create a model of the Antikythera Mechanism. It was used to determine and forecast important astronomical and calendar events. Furthermore, some unique mechanisms are being created, based on the Antikythera Mechanism, like the watch designed by Mathias Buttet for Hublot. Most models are now outdated due to new research findings. The Antikythera Mechanism: dates from 200—100 BCE; discovered in 1900 by a team of sponge divers off the south coast of Greece (near the islet of Antikythera, midway between the Peloponnese and Crete) Speaking of its current location in Athens: “It looks like something from another world –nothing like the classical statues and vases